Plan your future

Egg Freezing Consult

Curious about egg freezing and whether it’s right for you?

Come in for an egg freezing consultation, which includes:

  • One hour with the physician to review your health history
  • Pelvic ultrasound to assess ovarian reserve and antral follicle count

In just one hour, you’ll know your options. Then you can decide what’s right and when’s right for you.

Contact us to book today, at 415-964-5618 or [email protected].

You can also learn more about egg freezing at one of our free monthly info sessions. Check out our events page to RSVP. Friends and loved ones welcome.

Info Sessions

Not sure just yet and want to learn more? Join us for one of our free info sessions at Spring. You’ll be able to meet our team, tour our facility, and learn all about how we approach egg freezing as well as the facts and data to consider in planning for your future. Bring all your questions! Friends and loved ones welcome.

Reserve your spot today. Call us at 415-964-5618, email [email protected]  or RSVP on our events page.

We also hold community events to raise awareness about egg freezing and fertility care. Keep an eye on our events page for the details, and get in touch if you’d like to organize a talk with us.

Host a private info session Curious about egg freezing and have friends who are too? We now offer private info sessions for groups of 6 or more. Each can be tailored to your group’s specific questions and interests. We can even bring snacks.

Contact us today: 415-964-5618 or [email protected].

Payment plans

Egg Freezing Payment Plan (set up ACH when treatment initiated)

We are pleased to offer the following special payment plan on egg freezing with a no down payment and zero interest.

No Down Payment & No Interest Payment Plan Over 36 Months (for 1 cycle)  Includes ultrasound and blood monitoring, monitoring appointments, anesthesia, egg retrieval procedure, and egg freezing of up to 20 oocytes. The cost of freezing for each additional egg after 20 eggs is $100 each (not part of down payment or monthly payment).

Cost =

$0 Down

$295/month

36 months

Initial consult and hormone medications not included. We’re not a pharmacy, but we do have special package deals and lower rates from our pharmacy partners.

Shared Risk Guarantee

If you’re not successful, we shouldn’t be. The Spring Guarantee is our shared risk program. We offer up to a full refund – that’s right, your money back on egg freezing – to qualifying patients who freeze 20 eggs before age 35, or 30 eggs at ages 35-37, and cannot achieve a successful pregnancy when they return to use them.

* IVF, anesthesia and medications do not qualify for money back.

Become a Donor

Help a family have a family. Egg donors give the greatest gift of all: they help others achieve their dreams of a family. We’re pleased to support some amazing women willing to donate their eggs to people in need.

Qualifying applicants meet the following criteria

  • Motivated young women aged 21 to 30
  • Nonsmoking and in good overall health
  • No tattoos or piercings in the last year
  • Have not lived in the United Kingdom for over 3 months
  • Have not travelled to Zika endemic areas in the last 6 months

Donors must meet FDA and ASRM guidelines, and undergo a medical and psychological screening process with our team to ensure they’re ready. All ethnicities are welcome and encouraged to apply.

Curious if you qualify? Complete our egg donor interest form and we’ll get in touch.

EggShare Program

Pay it forward while planning for your future. Help a family have a family, while planning for your own. Our EggShare Program lets eligible women donate eggs while freezing some to keep for their own future use through egg freezing. All costs are covered, including storage of your frozen eggs for three (3) years or until age 30 (whichever is longer).

Curious if you qualify? Complete our pre-screening application and we’ll get in touch.

Questions? Contact [email protected] to learn more.

Egg freezing costs

We believe in simple, transparent pricing. If you are self-paying in full, with no coverage:

  • Initial Consult: $400, includes ultrasound, physical exam, physician consult
  • Egg Freezing Cycle: $8,750, includes all monitoring appointments (ultrasounds and blood work), anesthesia, egg retrieval, cryopreservation, and your storage fee for the first six months is waived.
  • Additional Storage: $600 per year

The total costs for each patient vary based on insurance and which protocol. Medication Packages from our pharmacy partners range from $3,900-$4,900, depending on your specific protocol and requirements.

Because some women require multiple cycles, we offer 10% off successive rounds of egg freezing.

Civil servants and active military We are proud to serve those who serve others and have special discounts* for teachers, nurses, police and firefighters, veterans, and active military.

While we’re glad to hear that Congress recently decided to cover fertility treatments for wounded veterans, we also offer special discounts* for veterans and active military as part of The American Society for Reproductive Medicine and The Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology’s Serving Our Veterans Program. (#IVF4VETS)

Are you a physician or a physician in training? We’re here to help you, too. See us and benefit from additional savings* on egg freezing and advanced fertility services.

Get in touch with our care team for more information, and look out for a community event near you.

*Discounts may not apply to all treatment packages. Please inquire with our financial navigators.

General

Options. You may not be ready to be a mom yet but want to preserve that option. Egg freezing provides the greatest opportunity to have a baby using your own eggs instead of donor eggs in the future. Freezing your eggs is about giving yourself some peace of mind and minimizing stress, so you can pursue your goals. It’s okay, now we can hit snooze on that biological clock.

Yes. Numerous studies investigating the long term consequences of ovarian stimulation show little to no significant risk. Serious complications are rare. Most women report mild bloating and fatigue.

We recommend numbers of eggs based on your age, reproductive history, ovarian reserve and family building goals. Everyone is different and your unique situation will help us arrive at an appropriate number for you, but we generally recommend 20 eggs for women under 35 and more for women over 35. For older women, this may mean multiple cycles, depending on your ovarian reserve.

If you aren’t successful, we shouldn’t be. Learn about our Spring Money Back Guarantee on egg freezing

When you’re ready, your eggs are thawed, fertilized with sperm, and ultimately transferred back to your uterus as embryos.

Medical

A woman’s age at the time an egg is released is the single most important factor affecting fertility. Beginning in your 20s, there’s a gradual decline in the ability to become pregnant. Around age 35, fertility begins to decline more rapidly. Freezing your eggs gives you more options for the future by preserving your eggs (and their current quality) today.
Two factors lead to this decline: fewer and lower quality eggs.

Fewer: eggs, unlike sperm, are only produced before a baby is born. At birth, a female is born with 1-2 million eggs. These eggs are called primordial follicles and are suspended in a state of partial maturity that is not completed until ovulation (often decades later). They are gradually released over the next 50 years. Total eggs remaining in the ovaries:

At birth: ~1-2 million
At puberty: ~400-500,000
At age 35: ~25,000

*Quality: While the total number of eggs available declines daily, egg quality also starts to drop as the long term effects of minor environmental damage add up. The cumulative effects of aging become apparent by your mid 30s, when eggs are more likely to produce chromosomal errors (called “aneuploidy”), leading to miscarriages and infertility.

Egg freezing (or ‘oocyte cryopreservation’) stops eggs from aging by placing them into a state of ‘biologic pause’ (vitrification) until a woman is ready to get pregnant. The health of those eggs is safely maintained at the age and time they were frozen.

Your uterus is amazing and is not affected by age the way eggs are. In fact, many women have conceived after menopause with donor eggs and a little estrogen to support the uterus.

Cryopreservation places cells into a “glass-like state” where all biologic processes stop by rapidly changing the temperature to -196°C using liquid nitrogen. The cell can be maintained in this state for years without aging. Your doctor will determine a protocol that’s right for you. Bioidentical hormones are used to help the ovaries produce multiple eggs from multiple follicles. These eggs are then retrieved from your body and cryopreserved a few hours later.

Turns out, cryopreservation of eggs takes lots of expertise. Prior to freezing, the embryologist safely replaces all the water from an egg with cryoprotectants. S/he rapidly moves the egg cell through different solutions and then must freeze (vitrify) the eggs in 1 microliter of water (that is 1/1000 of a milliliter). The whole process is still done by hand, and the best protocols are still considered trade secrets. At Spring, we’re proud to work with the best embryologists who have the best equipment to innovate and improve existing protocols.

Everyone has different plans, and when egg freezing fits for one person might not be the right time for another. There’s no clear answer and this is a personal choice, but we know that eggs are healthiest when women are in their mid 20’s. This is when women have the most follicles and eggs free of chromosomal abnormalities. This is why most egg donor programs only work with women between the ages of 21 to 30.
Everyone has different reproductive horizons: some women go through menopause at 51 while others might have their last menses at 41. Freezing eggs can seem expensive for younger women who are earlier in their careers, but the process is actually less expensive when you are younger. Older women commonly need to do more cycles at a greater expense because they produce fewer eggs and require more medication.

The best way to decide on whether and when to freeze your eggs is to have an initial consult. During this 60 minute appointment, we’ll perform a pelvic ultrasound and blood test to assess your ovarian function. Then we can discuss your treatment plan. The plan we choose depends on your unique situation. We want to understand your goals and concerns, and provide the best option for you.

This all depends on your “ovarian reserve” (or the number of eggs present in the ovaries at any given time). Younger women usually have more follicles (immature eggs) and can retrieve and preserve more good quality, mature eggs per stimulation cycle. At your first consult, a pelvic ultrasound with an antral follicle count gives us a good idea of how many to expect.

Again, this all depends on your age and antral follicle count, as well as your family-building goals. Some women retrieve all the eggs they need in one cycle. Others may require several cycles, especially if they think they might like to have multiple children when they’re ready. Your initial consult is the best way to get started. We’ll assess your ovarian reserve, and discuss your options. Together we’ll make a plan.

Since egg freezing is a relatively new procedure, there isn’t a lot of data on the long term storage of frozen eggs. Reports comparing eggs frozen for four years with those frozen for short durations do not show any adverse effects of longer storage. Animal studies and human embryos have shown good outcomes after over 20 years of being cryopreserved. So while we can never say with complete certainty, it seems that storage for up to 20 years can be both safe and effective.

Yes. Studies of over 5,000 children born from thawed/frozen eggs show no increased risk for congenital abnormalities or adverse pregnancy outcomes.

Your eggs are safe at Spring. Our building was constructed to meet or exceed modern seismic standards, including all California and local guidelines, and will easily withstand any anticipated tremors or quakes in the area.
In the event of a large and prolonged power outage, all of our critical equipment is connected to a large Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) system (with over 16,000 pounds of batteries!) located on site, so we are never subject to a power surge or failure. Our UPS immediately sends us an emergency alert and can maintain power for over 8 hours, allowing plenty of time to fire up our backup generator, which is also regularly maintained and tested. As with everything at Spring, we have backup systems for our backup systems, and we take nothing for granted.

Physical Impact

Protocols can vary but egg freezing is typically a two week process involving:

  • 1. 10-14 days of hormone stimulation, culminating in a final “trigger shot” 36 hours before the egg retrieval
  • 2. Usually 5 monitoring appointments
  • 3. The egg retrieval: a 20 minute procedure under sedation (you are asleep with an anesthesiologist present but you are not intubated or paralyzed)

Some patients may additionally benefit from two weeks of hormonal preparation prior to beginning stimulation. The addition of these medications helps follicles grow at the same rate to optimize the number of eggs retrieved.

Our goal is to obtain the greatest numbers of healthy eggs from your ovaries. The eggs begin in a small “antral” follicle in your ovary. Ovarian stimulation gently prompts these follicles to grow or “mature” a cohort of eggs. You will follow this process and can see how we measure your follicles during your monitoring appointments, which are usually 20-30 minute morning visits leading up to your retrieval.
Based on the growth of your follicles, assessed via ultrasound, and hormone levels, assessed via blood tests, we adjust your medications and time your final injection, the “trigger shot” which causes the eggs to finally mature in preparation for retrieval.

Some patients report bloating and feel tired from the hormones. These effects are usually well tolerated and do not require treatment.

For the most part, no, though injections can cause minor irritation and discomfort. We’ll provide instructions and tips to make it easy.
During the retrieval, you’ll be under anesthesia for 20 minutes. Most patients wake up with minimal discomfort or cramping that does not require additional medication. For the few patients who experience more severe cramping, rarely do they need more than Tylenol or ibuprofen (Advil).

The idea of giving yourself injections can be intimidating. While many people feel anxious the first or second time, hundreds of thousands of women have safely undergone hormone stimulation and find that they quickly get used to administering their own medications. Some patients have a friend or partner help with the injections. We also work with several nurses who offer home visits to administer nightly injections. Lastly, we can recommend a protocol with fewer shots for those who are still uncomfortable.

The night before, you’ll have a hearty dinner and then abstain from any food or drink after midnight. The morning of your retrieval, you’ll check in about an hour before the procedure. Your nurse will guide you over to the lab where you’ll change into a warm robe and place your belongings in a secure locker. You’ll meet the anesthesiologist and embryologist who will be caring for you and your eggs. Under their watchful eye, you’ll fall asleep under anesthesia, while our specialists aspirate your eggs using a very fine needle. 20 minutes later, you’ll awaken in our recovery area. Our care team will be there to look after you and ply you with juice and snacks. Most patients walk out the door about 45 minutes later, escorted home by a friend. Some get back to work within hours while others take the rest of the day off to rest.

Lifestyle Impact

People ask this all the time and unfortunately, you’ll hear varying (conflicting) opinions from different people in and outside of our field. At Spring, we recommend a healthy, balanced diet with proper hydration. Avoiding highly processed foods and anything that doesn’t have nutritional value is always smart. Beyond that, be good to you!

Alcohol is fine in moderation (1-2 drinks per day) until 2-3 days before your egg retrieval. Abstinence is fine too. Many people find this a good time to pursue their healthiest habits.

Research suggests mild to moderate caffeine intake is not associated with any adverse outcomes. Up to 2 cups of coffee per day are not associated with any worse outcomes.

In addition to numerous other health risks, cigarette smoking is a reproductive toxin. It accelerates the loss of eggs and can advance menopause. Less is known about marijuana.

Yes, but we recommend using a condom as your follicles grow. You may have many eggs developing and toward the end be at a high risk of pregnancy if any ovulate before retrieval. We recommend abstinence the week before and after your retrieval, as the ovaries may be enlarged and sensitive.

Yes. Moderate exercise is fine until around day 5 of stimulation, then we recommend low impact activities like hiking, yoga, or walking. After your retrieval, we recommend taking it easy from strenuous activities for about a week.

Hot tubs are fine if you are egg freezing. They should be avoided after an embryo transfer.

Egg freezing doesn’t require isolation! For your convenience and peace of mind, you may want to be local for stimulation through retrieval. However, travel is fine, as long as you can make it to your monitoring appointments. If you need to be out of town for a few days, you can if necessary find a fertility center there to do a monitoring appointment or two. When traveling long distances, you can keep refrigerated meds in a cooler pack and the TSA should let you through airport security just fine (though if you’d like a doctor’s note, we are happy to oblige).

Every relationship is unique. We believe that egg freezing is a positive, practical choice, and that families and partners should be supportive. Many patients tell us that going through the experience with their boyfriend or partner actually made them closer, and that sharing with their family members gave them comfort too.

You know your workplace dynamics best. We’ve noticed that as egg freezing becomes more common (and even covered by some employers), more and more patients feel comfortable sharing their experiences at work which we think is great. Most report being pleasantly surprised at how supportive their colleagues are of this choice, and by how many coworkers have done this themselves. Practically speaking, many people like inform their work in case of scheduling commitments or the need to stay local around the time of the actual egg retrieval.

Come visit us at Spring Fertility for a consult. Just contact us to book and we’ll send you a questionnaire, so we can review your file in advance of our first meeting. Your insurance may require pre-approval in order to cover the cost of the consult.
Not ready for a consult? Come for a free info session. You can meet our team, tour our lab, and get more information about egg freezing. We’re here for any and all your questions!

Financial Impact

Egg freezing is considered an elective procedure not covered by most commercial insurance plans. However, some policies do cover the initial consult and some of the medications, which our team can help you verify.

Professional fees are covered by most commercial carriers: Blue Cross, Blue Shield PPO, Aetna PPO, Cigna PPO. We also accept HMO with Brown & Toland Medical Group and Hills Physicians Medical Group and United Multiplan. The IVF lab and surgical center are not in network but most patients with IVF coverage have out of network benefits that cover most of these fees.

Many top employers in the Bay Area offer progressive fertility benefits to support their employees. Contact your HR department to see if yours does.

We believe in simple, transparent pricing. Our packages include anesthesia and intend to be comprehensive, except for medications (since we are not a pharmacy).
The costs, without coverage:

Initial Consult: $400, includes ultrasound, physical exam, physician consult
Egg Freezing Cycle: $8,750, includes monitoring, anesthesia, retrieval, cryopreservation, and storage for one year
Medication can range from $3,900-$4,900 without insurance coverage
Additional Storage: $600 per year – 
* Additional Cycles: 10% off

We offer a no interest payment plan for one cycle. We also offer medication packages separately, through our pharmacy partners.

Serve the community? We are proud to serve those who serve others and have special discounts. Learn more

At Spring Fertility, we believe everyone deserves a family if they want one, and we want to expand access to egg freezing to as many people as possible. We offer a zero interest, flexible payment plan, which features a $0 down payment and monthly installments of $295 for 36 months. Contact us for details.

Spring Fertility also partners with Prosper Healthcare, which offers financing plans. Learn more

Costs can vary by patient but current fees are $9,000 for advanced IVF procedures and an embryo transfer. This does not include preimplantation genetic testing or additional embryo freezing.

If you’re not successful, we shouldn’t be. The Spring Guarantee is our shared risk program. We offer up to a full refund to qualifying patients who freeze 20 eggs before age 35, or 30 eggs at ages 35-37, and cannot achieve a successful pregnancy when they return to use them.

We are delighted to be a resource as you figure out whether egg freezing is right for you. You’re welcome to call us at 415.964.5618 or email [email protected]
Another great way to learn more is to attend one of our free monthly info sessions which are open to the public. You can meet our team, tour the lab, learn about egg freezing, and ask questions.
We’re also holding community events with colleagues and partners all over the Bay Area! Visit our events to RSVP for an info session or event near you. Thanks and we look forward to meeting you!

Why should I freeze my eggs?

Options. You may not be ready to be a mom yet but want to preserve that option. Egg freezing provides the greatest opportunity to have a baby using your own eggs instead of donor eggs in the future. Freezing your eggs is about giving yourself some peace of mind and minimizing stress, so you can pursue your goals. It’s okay, now we can hit snooze on that biological clock.

Is it safe?

Yes. Numerous studies investigating the long term consequences of ovarian stimulation show little to no significant risk. Serious complications are rare. Most women report mild bloating and fatigue.

How many eggs do I need?

We recommend numbers of eggs based on your age, reproductive history, ovarian reserve and family building goals. Everyone is different and your unique situation will help us arrive at an appropriate number for you, but we generally recommend 20 eggs for women under 35 and more for women over 35. For older women, this may mean multiple cycles, depending on your ovarian reserve.

If you aren’t successful, we shouldn’t be. Learn about our Spring Money Back Guarantee on egg freezing

What happens when I’m ready to use my eggs?

When you’re ready, your eggs are thawed, fertilized with sperm, and ultimately transferred back to your uterus as embryos.

How does egg freezing work?

Cryopreservation places cells into a “glass-like state” where all biologic processes stop by rapidly changing the temperature to -196°C using liquid nitrogen. The cell can be maintained in this state for years without aging. Your doctor will determine a protocol that’s right for you. Bioidentical hormones are used to help the ovaries produce multiple eggs from multiple follicles. These eggs are then retrieved from your body and cryopreserved a few hours later.

What causes the decline in fertility?

A woman’s age at the time an egg is released is the single most important factor affecting fertility. Beginning in your 20s, there’s a gradual decline in the ability to become pregnant. Around age 35, fertility begins to decline more rapidly. Freezing your eggs gives you more options for the future by preserving your eggs (and their current quality) today.
Two factors lead to this decline: fewer and lower quality eggs.
Fewer: eggs, unlike sperm, are only produced before a baby is born. At birth, a female is born with 1-2 million eggs. These eggs are called primordial follicles and are suspended in a state of partial maturity that is not completed until ovulation (often decades later). They are gradually released over the next 50 years. Total eggs remaining in the ovaries:
At birth: ~1-2 million
At puberty: ~400-500,000
At age 35: ~25,000

*Quality: While the total number of eggs available declines daily, egg quality also starts to drop as the long term effects of minor environmental damage add up. The cumulative effects of aging become apparent by your mid 30s, when eggs are more likely to produce chromosomal errors (called “aneuploidy”), leading to miscarriages and infertility.

How does egg freezing help?

Egg freezing (or ‘oocyte cryopreservation’) stops eggs from aging by placing them into a state of ‘biologic pause’ (vitrification) until a woman is ready to get pregnant. The health of those eggs is safely maintained at the age and time they were frozen.

What about my uterus? Even if I freeze my eggs, isn’t my womb aging too?

Your uterus is amazing and is not affected by age the way eggs are. In fact, many women have conceived after menopause with donor eggs and a little estrogen to support the uterus.

Why is it so new?

Turns out, cryopreservation of eggs takes lots of expertise. Prior to freezing, the embryologist safely replaces all the water from an egg with cryoprotectants. S/he rapidly moves the egg cell through different solutions and then must freeze (vitrify) the eggs in 1 microliter of water (that is 1/1000 of a milliliter). The whole process is still done by hand, and the best protocols are still considered trade secrets. At Spring, we’re proud to work with the best embryologists who have the best equipment to innovate and improve existing protocols.

When should I freeze my eggs?

Everyone has different plans, and when egg freezing fits for one person might not be the right time for another. There’s no clear answer and this is a personal choice, but we know that eggs are healthiest when women are in their mid 20’s. This is when women have the most follicles and eggs free of chromosomal abnormalities. This is why most egg donor programs only work with women between the ages of 21 to 30.
Everyone has different reproductive horizons: some women go through menopause at 51 while others might have their last menses at 41. Freezing eggs can seem expensive for younger women who are earlier in their careers, but the process is actually less expensive when you are younger. Older women commonly need to do more cycles at a greater expense because they produce fewer eggs and require more medication.

So what if I’m 25? 30? 35? 40?

The best way to decide on whether and when to freeze your eggs is to have an initial consult. During this 60 minute appointment, we’ll perform a pelvic ultrasound and blood test to assess your ovarian function. Then we can discuss your treatment plan. The plan we choose depends on your unique situation. We want to understand your goals and concerns, and provide the best option for you.

How many eggs will I be able to freeze?

This all depends on your “ovarian reserve” (or the number of eggs present in the ovaries at any given time). Younger women usually have more follicles (immature eggs) and can retrieve and preserve more good quality, mature eggs per stimulation cycle. At your first consult, a pelvic ultrasound with an antral follicle count gives us a good idea of how many to expect.

Will I have to do multiple cycles?

Again, this all depends on your age and antral follicle count, as well as your family-building goals. Some women retrieve all the eggs they need in one cycle. Others may require several cycles, especially if they think they might like to have multiple children when they’re ready. Your initial consult is the best way to get started. We’ll assess your ovarian reserve, and discuss your options. Together we’ll make a plan.

How long can eggs be frozen?

Since egg freezing is a relatively new procedure, there isn’t a lot of data on the long term storage of frozen eggs. Reports comparing eggs frozen for four years with those frozen for short durations do not show any adverse effects of longer storage. Animal studies and human embryos have shown good outcomes after over 20 years of being cryopreserved. So while we can never say with complete certainty, it seems that storage for up to 20 years can be both safe and effective.

Is it safe for my future baby?

Yes. Studies of over 5,000 children born from thawed/frozen eggs show no increased risk for congenital abnormalities or adverse pregnancy outcomes.

This is San Francisco, what if there’s an earthquake?

Your eggs are safe at Spring. Our building was constructed to meet or exceed modern seismic standards, including all California and local guidelines, and will easily withstand any anticipated tremors or quakes in the area.
In the event of a large and prolonged power outage, all of our critical equipment is connected to a large Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) system (with over 16,000 pounds of batteries!) located on site, so we are never subject to a power surge or failure. Our UPS immediately sends us an emergency alert and can maintain power for over 8 hours, allowing plenty of time to fire up our backup generator, which is also regularly maintained and tested. As with everything at Spring, we have backup systems for our backup systems, and we take nothing for granted.

What is the egg freezing process like?

Protocols can vary but egg freezing is typically a two week process involving:

1. 10-14 days of hormone stimulation, culminating in a final “trigger shot” 36 hours before the egg retrieval
2. Usually 5 monitoring appointments
3. The egg retrieval: a 20 minute procedure under sedation (you are asleep with an anesthesiologist present but you are not intubated or paralyzed)

Some patients may additionally benefit from two weeks of hormonal preparation prior to beginning stimulation. The addition of these medications helps follicles grow at the same rate to optimize the number of eggs retrieved.

What happens during ovarian stimulation?

Our goal is to obtain the greatest numbers of healthy eggs from your ovaries. The eggs begin in a small “antral” follicle in your ovary. Ovarian stimulation gently prompts these follicles to grow or “mature” a cohort of eggs. You will follow this process and can see how we measure your follicles during your monitoring appointments, which are usually 20-30 minute morning visits leading up to your retrieval. Based on the growth of your follicles, assessed via ultrasound, and hormone levels, assessed via blood tests, we adjust your medications and time your final injection, the “trigger shot” which causes the eggs to finally mature in preparation for retrieval.

Are there any side effects?

Some patients report bloating and feel tired from the hormones. These effects are usually well tolerated and do not require treatment.

Will it hurt?

For the most part, no, though injections can cause minor irritation and discomfort. We’ll provide instructions and tips to make it easy. During the retrieval, you’ll be under anesthesia for 20 minutes. Most patients wake up with minimal discomfort or cramping that does not require additional medication. For the few patients who experience more severe cramping, rarely do they need more than Tylenol or ibuprofen (Advil).

Wait, inject myself? Really?

The idea of giving yourself injections can be intimidating. While many people feel anxious the first or second time, hundreds of thousands of women have safely undergone hormone stimulation and find that they quickly get used to administering their own medications. Some patients have a friend or partner help with the injections. We also work with several nurses who offer home visits to administer nightly injections. Lastly, we can recommend a protocol with fewer shots for those who are still uncomfortable.

What is the retrieval procedure like?

The night before, you’ll have a hearty dinner and then abstain from any food or drink after midnight. The morning of your retrieval, you’ll check in about an hour before the procedure. Your nurse will guide you over to the lab where you’ll change into a warm robe and place your belongings in a secure locker. You’ll meet the anesthesiologist and embryologist who will be caring for you and your eggs. Under their watchful eye, you’ll fall asleep under anesthesia, while our specialists aspirate your eggs using a very fine needle. 20 minutes later, you’ll awaken in our recovery area. Our care team will be there to look after you and ply you with juice and snacks. Most patients walk out the door about 45 minutes later, escorted home by a friend. Some get back to work within hours while others take the rest of the day off to rest.

What should I eat?

People ask this all the time and unfortunately, you’ll hear varying (conflicting) opinions from different people in and outside of our field. At Spring, we recommend a healthy, balanced diet with proper hydration. Avoiding highly processed foods and anything that doesn’t have nutritional value is always smart. Beyond that, be good to you!

Can I drink?

Alcohol is fine in moderation (1-2 drinks per day) until 2-3 days before your egg retrieval. Abstinence is fine too. Many people find this a good time to pursue their healthiest habits.

How about coffee?

Research suggests mild to moderate caffeine intake is not associated with any adverse outcomes. Up to 2 cups of coffee per day are not associated with any worse outcomes.

Can I smoke?

In addition to numerous other health risks, cigarette smoking is a reproductive toxin. It accelerates the loss of eggs and can advance menopause. Less is known about marijuana.

Can I have sex?

Yes, but we recommend using a condom as your follicles grow. You may have many eggs developing and toward the end be at a high risk of pregnancy if any ovulate before retrieval. We recommend abstinence the week before and after your retrieval, as the ovaries may be enlarged and sensitive.

Can I work out?

Yes. Moderate exercise is fine until around day 5 of stimulation, then we recommend low impact activities like hiking, yoga, or walking. After your retrieval, we recommend taking it easy from strenuous activities for about a week.

What about hot tubs or jacuzzis?

Hot tubs are fine if you are egg freezing. They should be avoided after an embryo transfer.

Can I travel?

Egg freezing doesn’t require isolation! For your convenience and peace of mind, you may want to be local for stimulation through retrieval. However, travel is fine, as long as you can make it to your monitoring appointments. If you need to be out of town for a few days, you can if necessary find a fertility center there to do a monitoring appointment or two. When traveling long distances, you can keep refrigerated meds in a cooler pack and the TSA should let you through airport security just fine (though if you’d like a doctor’s note, we are happy to oblige).

Should I tell my boyfriend, partner, or family?

Every relationship is unique. We believe that egg freezing is a positive, practical choice, and that families and partners should be supportive. Many patients tell us that going through the experience with their boyfriend or partner actually made them closer, and that sharing with their family members gave them comfort too.

Should I tell my work?

You know your workplace dynamics best. We’ve noticed that as egg freezing becomes more common (and even covered by some employers), more and more patients feel comfortable sharing their experiences at work which we think is great. Most report being pleasantly surprised at how supportive their colleagues are of this choice, and by how many coworkers have done this themselves. Practically speaking, many people like inform their work in case of scheduling commitments or the need to stay local around the time of the actual egg retrieval.

How do I get started?

Come visit us at Spring Fertility for a consult. Just contact us to book and we’ll send you a questionnaire, so we can review your file in advance of our first meeting. Your insurance may require pre-approval in order to cover the cost of the consult.
Not ready for a consult? Come for a free info session. You can meet our team, tour our lab, and get more information about egg freezing. We’re here for any and all your questions!

Will my insurance cover egg freezing?

Egg freezing is considered an elective procedure not covered by most commercial insurance plans. However, some policies do cover the initial consult and some of the medications, which our team can help you verify.

What insurance do you take?

Professional fees are covered by most commercial carriers: Blue Cross, Blue Shield PPO, Aetna PPO, Cigna PPO. We also accept HMO with Brown & Toland Medical Group and Hills Physicians Medical Group and United Multiplan. The IVF lab and surgical center are not in network but most patients with IVF coverage have out of network benefits that cover most of these fees.

Will my employer cover egg freezing?

Many top employers in the Bay Area offer progressive fertility benefits to support their employees. Contact your HR department to see if yours does.

Do I have to pay in full?

At Spring Fertility, we believe everyone deserves a family if they want one, and we want to expand access to egg freezing to as many people as possible. We offer a zero interest, flexible payment plan, which features a low down payment of $2,950 and monthly installments of $159 for 36 months. Contact us for details.

Spring Fertility also partners with Prosper Healthcare, which offers financing plans. Learn more

How much will it cost to use my eggs later on?

Costs can vary by patient but current fees are $9,000 for advanced IVF procedures and an embryo transfer. This does not include preimplantation genetic testing or additional embryo freezing.

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